Best eye exam

For exactly one day last month, people across the U.S. were allowed to become technological Explorers. That’s because Google offered its revolutionary new ocular product, prescription Google Glass, for limited sale from 9 a.m. on April 15 until the end of the day — months before its proper launch date later this year. And it worked.

Google has also allowed certain optics students around the country who work in laboratories to become Explorers as well, fitting them with their own stylish Glass frames. But why would any average person want to have a mini-computer attached mere inches from their right retina at all times, utilizing a system of voice commands? For that answer, you’d do well to ask the folks at Google themselves.

Or you might do better to ask your eye doctor. After all, the long-term effects of prescription Google Glass haven’t been studied yet because it’s such a new product. But your optometrist might have something to say about it, especially given this set of staggering statistics…

Nearly 22 million Americans are currently suffering from cataracts.

Cataracts occur when there’s clouding of the lens of the eye, a condition that might prove to be quite detrimental to the enjoyment of a Google Glass for one simple reason — it can cause vision loss. The most common causes are age, injuries, infections and diseases like diabetes. In order to test for cataracts, you’d do well to make an appointment with your eye doctor and let him or her give you the best eye exam you can get.

Glaucoma affects about 2.2 million adults age 40 and older.

Ask anyone: once you find an eye doctor, you’re not likely to let him or her go, and the reason is simple. They keep you in your best ocular health and they help you spot if you’re one of these millions of Americans at risk of potentially developing glaucoma. Ever had the air-puff test at the optometrist’s office? The doctor blows a cloud of air into your eyes to measure their pressure. Diabetes and other illnesses can cause glaucoma and vision loss in people of all ages.

Computer vision syndrome is real and growing.

Though it might sound like some kind of newfangled disease, computer vision syndrome is currently affecting the thousands of American who spent their workdays staring at their computer screens. Retina decay can happen simply from repeating the same actions again and again in the oppressive LED lights of your cubicle. The best remedy? Look away from your monitor every 20 minutes or so to readjust your eyes. Of course, who knows what new developments will be shown when prescription Google Glass hits the nation at large later this year.

Now you know the benefits of seeing an eye doctor regularly. What are you waiting for? Make an appointment today — especially if you’re thinking of becoming a Google Glass Explorer in the near future. Helpful links: Houston eye clinic